Monday, January 1, 2018

Quick Review: Star Wars: The Last Jedi

Star Wars: The Last Jedi
Music composed by John Williams
Music conducted by John Williams
Additional conducting by William Ross
Music recorded at Sony Scoring Stage
Album running time: 77 minutes
Available on Walt Disney Records

The much anticipated sequel to The Force Awakens arrived with a new Star Wars score by John Williams.  It's hard to believe that this is his 8th film in the series going from 1977 to 2017.

Themes!  We got themes!  A foundation of the series are the various leitmotifs - some used quite frequently through the films.  For this film, Williams marries the original trilogy thematic material with his Force Awakens material (which he expands and varies).  New themes to this film aren't as prominent compared to the previous entry and a lot of the emotional impact of the score is used with previous material.  

This will be a track-by track look at the soundtrack - so this is your spoiler warning.  You probably wouldn't be reading this if you hadn't seen the film anyhow....

Main Title and Escape begins with the standard main title cue underscoring the opening crawl.  The Escape part is some of the best action writing, reminiscent of the flashy opening to Revenge of the Sith or the Hoth battle in Empire Strikes Back.  Several flashes of themes make appearances amidst the action: Kylo Ren, variations of the Resistance March, brassy Rebel fanfare for heroic moments and an allusion to Poe Dameron's theme.  As the track gears towards the end, dramatic writing takes over, fitting the dire situations on screen.

Ahch-To Island returns us to the meeting of Rey and Luke Skywalker and Williams uses his Jedi Steps theme (last heard as Rey reached the island at the end of The Force Awakens).  The darker tone of Rey and Luke's training are explored alongside the stunning vistas of Luke's island locale.  The Force theme rightfully appears as well as a sweeping reprise of Rey's Theme.  Introduced is a new (what I'll call) Jedi Master theme - a very ominous and dramatic pattern that appears later in the film.  

Revisiting Snoke gives us more of the dark Snoke material - with low strings, low woodwinds among the men's chorus.  Reprises of Kylo Ren's theme and Darth Vader's theme add to the dark side's suspenseful atmosphere.  The Supremacy shows off Williams' techniques of leitmotif.  Throughout the action cue, Kylo Ren's dark theme is matched against the Resistance March and strong string writing.  Leia's theme is given a ghostly rendition on piano with sustained strings along with the Force theme before the strings take off with Leia's theme in her heroic space journey.  Rey's theme returns at the close of the track quietly on harp.

Fun With Finn and Rose gives us Rose's theme, a charming and optimistic new piece which is sprinkled throughout the rest of the film and the focus of The Last Jedi's new concert suite.  The woodwinds continue into a more whimsical Resistance March, with Leia's theme appearing yet again.  

Back with Luke and Rey in Old Friends, we get a handful of lovely magical variations on the Force theme, Luke's theme and Leia's theme.  Things get darker as the story turns to Rey with some dissonant writing and a statement of the Jedi Master theme.  The Rebellion is Reborn is a concert suite of new themes for the film - a rollicking Rose theme intermixed with the Jedi Master theme.  Continuing with Rey's training, Lesson One has a calm rendition of Rey and the Force's themes, letting them flow into each other.  As the tension builds towards her darker side, the orchestra reaches a climax near the end of the cue.  

Following the grandiose location setting music, we hear the background music of the casino on Canto Bight.  Harkening back to A New Hope, the bluesy jazz style and orchestration fit alongside Cantina Band.  Some listeners may hear similarities to Harry Potter's Knight Bus as well.  Snuck into the casino scenes are bits of Aquarela Do Brasil and even a nod to the title tune from The Long Goodbye (not used on album).    

Who Are You? follows the more ominous and brooding underscore of Rey's training and darker side connections she has made.  The Fathiers is one of the stronger action cues of the new film, with galloping rhythms, the large orchestra whipping around and several large statements of Rose's theme.  The Cave begins with an impressionistic, almost blurry sound.  The dissonances are meant to put you on edge, with some more interesting orchestral techniques being used.  Rey's theme is given a forlorn treatment near the end.  The Sacred Jedi Texts continues the interplay of themes - the Force theme both in small and regal statements and a newly reprised Yoda's theme.  It's a tender moment for the two Jedi and the music relates that as well.

In A New Alliance, Rey and Kylo Ren meet with Snoke.  The ominous low voices appear and provide some more dark underscore.  As the scene turns to action, the brass give several blasts of the Force theme with strings and percussion adding a Stravinsky-like pounding.  Rey's theme is added onto these pounding textures with a few heroic fanfares.  Chrome Dome features more fierce percussion and usual trumpet triplets to underscore another major fight.  The Rebel fanfare makes an appearance, as does a Resistance danger theme, but Williams doesn't include Finn's very rhythmic theme.  

The Battle of Crait shows off Williams' incorporation of themes within a large action sequence.  Within the propulsive action writing is the Force theme, Resistance March, Rose's theme, Rey's theme, Kylo's theme and the Rebel fanfare.  One of the more surprising returns are quotes of TIE Fighter Attack (Here They Come) from A New Hope as the Millenium Falcon arrives on the scene.  The action is relentless until the end with a wordless choir for Finn's emotional mission.  The Spark underscores the emotional reunion of Luke and Leia.  The Force theme leads into a cello-led Luke and Leia's theme (last heard in Return of the Jedi) before quoting Han Solo and the Princess.  As Luke goes to confront his former student, the musical buildup sounds like a mix of Imperial March and Jedi Master theme - one of the great moments of the score.

The Last Jedi is the showdown itself - a mix of quiet moments with large choral and orchestral moments.  Kylo Ren's theme with choir and the Force theme statements are highlights of the cue.  Peace and Purpose recalls the large orchestral statement of the Force theme from A New Hope's Binary Sunset before turning to a militaristic Kylo Ren's theme.  Poe's theme makes an album appearance (it is featured slightly more in the film) alongside statements of Rey's theme intermixed into the Force theme which then leads into the optimistic Rebel fanfare.  Finale begins with a magical rendition of the main title/Luke's theme as a possible Force user finds his powers while another broad Force theme leads to the end credits.  The credits begin the way they always do and then feature a medley of themes: Rose's theme, Princess Leia's theme, Jedi Master, Resistance March, Rey's theme, Yoda's theme, Resistance danger theme and TIE Fighter Attack.  It ends with Rey's theme and a light celeste solo similar to the last film.  It's a bit of a grab bag, and not as cohesive as past end credit suites.  And of course, the abrupt piano version of Leia's theme matches the onscreen dedication to actress Carrie Fisher.  

It's amazing what John Williams has maintained in his Star Wars scores.  The expansion and inclusion of themes from 1977-now is spectacular but his scores don't rely on those themes to make it sound "like Star Wars".  He is also an expert of adding those themes into an action or dramatic sequence as seen in several moments of the film.  For new material, Rose's theme is certainly the standout (a printed score of Rebellion is Reborn is due in the near future, so expect to hear that at a variety of concerts).  

In every scene from action to pure drama, Williams' score buoys it to another level.  The soundtrack album is a great representation of the score and carries so many film highlights without discussing all the microedits and missing material possibly heard in an expanded release.  It's hard to compare this score to the others in the series, as this score is still so fresh and I'm discovering new aspects with each listen.  Even if you disliked the film, the flaws don't seem to rest on Williams and the masterful work laid out in the score.

Monday, December 18, 2017

2018: Top Anticipated Scores

2018 has quite a pile of film scores to really look forward to.  To no one's surprise, there are tons of anticipated sequels and adaptations.  Of course there are always surprises along the way, so we'll see what happens!  Here's the list:   

Music Behind the Screen's 
Top Anticipated Scores of 2018

1. Incredibles 2 (Michael Giacchino)
Finally the arguably most requested Pixar sequel arrives.  Michael Giacchino's Bond-inspired jazz sound and Gordon Goodwin's big band arrangement made the first film's score a hit.  It's also the film that brought Giacchino to forefront of Pixar and blockbuster films, and I hope this makes a big splash as well.    

2. Solo: A Star Wars Story (John Powell)
These standalone Star Wars films have had their share of composer drama.  With a directorial switch to Ron Howard, John Powell was chosen to score the film.  Powell is a name I wouldn't have assumed would join this franchise, but it did get me giddy with possibilities.   

3. Avengers: Infinity War (Alan Silvestri)
Of the MCU's apparent score continuity issues, one composer's work keeps popping back in.  Silvestri's Avengers theme will probably be prominent but as so many superheroes team up, it's unknown if their various themes (by a half dozen composers) will be incorporated.  Also, Silvestri scoring large scale action scenes is enough to get me excited.    
   
4. Isle Of Dogs (Alexandre Desplat)
There is something about Desplat's scores for Wes Anderson films that work so well.  The quirky side of both creators are on display, and this upcoming film is stop-motion animated like their previous Fantastic Mr. Fox.  (Their last collaboration, Grand Budapest Hotel in 2014 got Desplat an Academy Award) 

5. Ready Player One (Alan Silvestri)
Stepping in for John Williams on this sci-fi action adaptation, Silvestri could bring enough interesting sounds to help create the universe and OASIS world.  Given the 1980's references and Easter eggs, it's not surprising to see Silvestri attached.   

6. Fantastic Beasts: The Crimes of Grindlewald (James Newton Howard)
Making a big splash with his score into the new Wizarding World franchise, Howard thankfully gets to continue and add more thematic continuity.  He seems very adept to go fom the darker moments to the most magical.  His first score was a delight and he has already been using its suites in his live concert tours.      

OTHER SCORES TO HEAR IN 2018
Annihilation (Geoff Barrow/Ben Salisbury)
Ant-Man and the Wasp (Christophe Beck)
Black Panther (Ludwig Goransson)
Early Man (Harry Gregson-Williams)
First Man (Justin Hurwitz)
Holmes and Watson (Christophe Beck)
How the Grinch Stole Christmas (Danny Elfman)
Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom (Michael Giacchino)
Mary Poppins Returns (Marc Shaiman/Lin-Manuel Miranda)
Mission: Impossible 6 (Joe Kraemer)
The Nutcracker and the Four Realms (James Newton Howard)
Rampage (Andrew Lockington)
Red Sparrow (James Newton Howard)
The Women of Marwen (Alan Silvestri)
A Wrinkle in Time (Ramin Djawadi)

Anything you're patiently (or impatiently) waiting for in 2018?

Saturday, December 9, 2017

2017 Original Score Awards Roundup

Here's the 2017 Roundup of Original Score nominations and winners from various associations. Winners will be marked in red and updated regularly!

ACADEMY AWARD
BEST ORIGINAL SCORE

[nominations January 23rd]
[winners announced March 4th]

GOLDEN GLOBE
BEST ORIGINAL SCORE 

Dunkirk (Hans Zimmer)
Phantom Thread (Jonny Greenwood)
The Post (John Williams)
*The Shape of Water (Alexandre Desplat)
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri (Carter Burwell)

BRITISH ACADEMY FILM AWARDS (BAFTA)
Blade Runner 2049 (Hans Zimmer, Benjamin Wallfisch)
Darkest Hour (Dario Marianelli)
Dunkirk (Hans Zimmer)
Phantom Thread (Jonny Greenwood)
The Shape of Water (Alexandre Desplat)
[winners announced February 18th]

ANNIE AWARDS
OUTSTANDING ACHIEVEMENT IN AN ANIMATED FEATURE PRODUCTION

[winners announced February 3rd]
The Breadwinner (Mychael Danna & Jeff Danna)
Captain Underpants: The First Epic Movie (Theodore Shapiro)
Coco (Michael Giacchino, Kristen Anderson-Lopez, Robert Lopez & Germaine Franco)
Loving Vincent (Clint Mansell)
Olaf’s Frozen Adventure (Christophe Beck, Elyssa Samsel & Kate Anderson)
[winners announced February 3rd] 

SATELLITE AWARDS (INTERNATIONAL PRESS ACADEMY)
ORIGINAL SCORE

[winners announced February 10]
Darkest Hour (Dario Marianelli)
Dunkirk (Hans Zimmer)
The Shape of Water (Alexandre Desplat)
War for the Planet of the Apes (Michael Giacchino)
Wonderstruck (Carter Burwell)
Wonder Woman (Rupert Gregson-Williams)

LOS ANGELES FILM CRITICS ASSOCIATION
BEST MUSIC SCORE

*Phantom Thread (Jonny Greenwood)
The Shape of Water (Alexandre Desplat) [runner-up]

LOS ANGELES ONLINE FILM CRITICS SOCIETY
BEST SCORE

Blade Runner 2049 (Hans Zimmer, Benjamin Wallfisch)
Dunkirk (Hans Zimmer)
Phantom Thread (Jonny Greenwood)
*The Shape of Water (Alexandre Desplat)
War for the Planet of the Apes (Michael Giacchino)

SAN DIEGO FILM CRITICS SOCIETY
BEST USE OF MUSIC IN A FILM

*Baby Driver
Beauty and the Beast
Call Me By Your Name [Runner-up]
Dunkirk
The Shape of Water


San Francisco Film Critics Circle
BEST ORIGINAL SCORE
Blade Runner 2049 (Hans Zimmer, Benjamin Wallfisch)
Dunkirk (Hans Zimmer)
*Phantom Thread (Jonny Greenwood)
The Shape of Water (Alexandre Desplat)
War for the Planet of the Apes (Michael Giacchino)

Seattle Film Critics Society
BEST ORIGINAL SCORE
Blade Runner 2049 (Hans Zimmer, Benjamin Wallfisch)
Dunkirk (Hans Zimmer)
*Phantom Thread (Jonny Greenwood)
War for the Planet of the Apes (Michael Giacchino)
Wonderstruck (Carter Burwell)

WASHINGTON DC AREA FILM CRITICS ASSOCIATION
BEST ORIGINAL SCORE

*Blade Runner 2049 (Hans Zimmer, Benjamin Wallfisch)

BOSTON SOCIETY OF FILM CRITICS
BEST USE OF MUSIC IN A FILM

*Phantom Thread (Jonny Greenwood)

CHICAGO FILM CRITICS AWARDS
BEST ORIGINAL SCORE

Blade Runner 2049 (Hans Zimmer, Benjamin Wallfisch)
Dunkirk (Hans Zimmer)
*Phantom Thread (Jonny Greenwood)
The Shape of Water (Alexandre Desplat)
War for the Planet of the Apes (Michael Giacchino)

DETROIT FILM CRITICS SOCIETY
BEST USE OF MUSIC
*Baby Driver
Good Time
Phantom Thread
The Shape of Water

ST. LOUIS FILM CRITICS ASSOCIATION
BEST MUSIC SCORE

Blade Runner 2049 (Hans Zimmer, Benjamin Wallfisch)
Dunkirk (Hans Zimmer)
*Phantom Thread (Jonny Greenwood)
The Post (John Williams)
The Shape of Water (Alexandre Desplat)

AUSTIN FILM CRITICS ASSOCIATION
BEST SCORE
*The Shape of Water (Alexandre Desplat)

DALLAS-FORT WORTH FILM CRITICS ASSOCIATION
BEST MUSICAL SCORE

*The Shape of Water (Alexandre Desplat)
Dunkirk (Hans Zimmer) [runner-up]

HOUSTON FILM CRITICS SOCIETY
BEST ORIGINAL SCORE

Blade Runner 2049 (Hans Zimmer, Benjamin Wallfisch)
Dunkirk (Hans Zimmer)
The Post (John Williams)
*The Shape of Water (Alexandre Desplat)
War for the Planet of the Apes (Michael Giacchino)

LAS VEGAS FILM CRITICS SOCIETY
BEST SCORE

*The Shape of Water (Alexandre Desplat)

FLORIDA FILM CRITICS CIRCLE

BEST SCORE
*Blade Runner 2049 (Hans Zimmer, Benjamin Wallfisch)
Dunkirk (Hans Zimmer) [runner-up]
The Shape of Water (Alexandre Desplat)
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri (Carter Burwell)

GEORGIA FILM CRITICS ASSOCIATION
BEST ORIGINAL SCORE
Blade Runner 2049 (Hans Zimmer, Benjamin Wallfisch)
Darkest Hour (Dario Marianelli)
Dunkirk (Hans Zimmer)
Phantom Thread (Jonny Greenwood)
The Post (John Williams)
The Shape of Water (Alexandre Desplat)
War for the Planet of the Apes (Michael Giacchino)

LONDON CRITICS CIRCLE FILM AWARDS
TECHNICAL ACHIEVEMENT (FOR MUSIC)

*Dunkirk (Hans Zimmer)

CRITICS CHOICE AWARDS
BEST SCORE

[winners announced January 11]
Blade Runner 2049 (Hans Zimmer, Benjamin Wallfisch)
Darkest Hour (Dario Marianelli)
Dunkirk (Hans Zimmer)
Phantom Thread (Jonny Greenwood)
The Post (John Williams)
The Shape of Water (Alexandre Desplat)

SATURN AWARDS
BEST MUSIC

Sunday, October 22, 2017

Rejected Scores: Part II

Stage discussion (l-r) Malcolm Arnold, William Walton, Guy Hamilton

In this post found here, I featured stories of notable rejected scores and their replacements.
Here are a few more notable examples and some favorite stories of mine.  

9. Team America: World Police (2004)
[Marc Shaiman]

After their work on the South Park film in 1999, creators Trey Parker and Matt Stone got to work on their puppet comedy. After co-writing songs, Shaiman turned to writing the score while filming was still going. The plan was to rush through post production so the film could be released before the upcoming US election. The team finally caught up with Shaiman after a majority of the score was recorded, and decided to ditch the playful score. The studio and Parker wanted a score to match the Jerry Bruckheimer/Media Ventures sound the film was parodying, so they turned to Harry Gregson-Williams. Gregson-Williams scored it (with additional members from MV) like a straight action film in only a few weeks. Everything was so rushed, the original soundtrack famously doesn't list Gregson-Williams' name. 

8. The Golden Child (1986)
[John Barry]

For this Eddie Murphy Tibet-themed comedy, we got an lush Asian inspired Barry score and action similar to his later Bond films. Producers clashed with Barry during post production, and test screenings indicated a change of direction toward a contemporary synth sound better fitting the Eddie Murphy character. Michel Colombier was hired to compose a new score in a matter of weeks, with the final film and soundtrack still containing Barry cues.

7. Jennifer 8 (1992)
[Maurice Jarre]

Producers of this cop thriller sought after high-profile composer Maurice Jarre even while director Bruce Robinson had Christopher Young in mind after being a fan of Young's The Fly II. The studio won out, with Jarre writing and recording around 40 minutes of music. Apparently a lack of communication between Jarre and Robinson gave him not exactly what he wanted for the film. So Jarre was out and Young was brought in to compose his haunting score. Interestingly enough, 19 years later, Robinson worked with Young again on The Rum Diary.

6. Timeline (2003)
[Jerry Goldsmith]

After months of composing and recording the score for director Richard Donner, Goldsmith's score basically got edited out as the film headed into trouble. Reshoots, massive editing and bad screenings led to Goldsmith either redoing everything or backing out. For the action sound Donner wanted, he turned to relative newcomer Brian Tyler. Goldsmith's score ended up being his penultimate release with his passing in 2004.

5. Mission: Impossible (1996)
[Alan Silvestri]

According to director Brian DePalma, Silvestri's action score never worked being too busy or too melodic. As he was composing and finishing a day of recording, he received a call and was off the project. At the request of star/producer Tom Cruise, they turned to Danny Elfman who had just come off of a score for To Die For, starring Nicole Kidman. With limited time, Elfman composed a percussive action score unlike his previous work. 

4. Chinatown (1974)
[Phillip Lambro]

Fresh from the classical world but trying to break into film scoring, Lambro wrote the original score to Chinatown on the request of director Roman Polanski. After poorly received test screenings, it was decided to scrap his entire period-infused score. Producers turned to Jerry Goldsmith for the new score - and had to compose the replacement in 10 days. Even with this short span, Goldsmith's replacement score has become a classic. Oddly, it was Lambro's score that made appearances in the film's trailer and ads. 


3. Rogue One: A Star Wars Story (2016)
[Alexandre Desplat]

With Alexandre Desplat reuniting with director Gareth Edwards after Godzilla, it seemed like we'd get a different vision for a Star Wars score. Desplat got to work writing, but hadn't recorded anything from the score. As extensive reshoots muddled the production, Desplat's scoring schedule was adjusted and he'd no longer be available. Disney and Lucasfilm turned to Michael Giacchino, known for his large thematic orchestral scores for the studio. A lifelong dream to follow in the John Williams tradition, Giacchino only had around three months before the film's release. 

2. Miss Congeniality 2: Armed and Fabulous (2005)
[Randy Edelman, John Van Tongeren]

Possibly the biggest offender of rejected scores are temp scores, the music used during production before the final score gets added. With this sequel, Edelman's original score (with additional music by Christophe Beck and John Van Tongeren) couldn't keep up with the temp score and basically was all dropped with Tongeren receiving composing credit. Film score fans probably can't make it through the final film with random cues from Miss Congeniality, Two Weeks Notice, I Am Sam, My Best Friends Wedding, Sweet November and even Chicken Run being used. (Edward Schearmur, John Powell, John Powell, James Newton Howard, Christopher Young, John Powell/Harry Gregson-Williams, respectively)

1. Battle of Britain (1969)
[William Walton]
Classical composer Sir William Walton returned to the film world, swayed by friends like lead actor Sir Laurence Olivier and composer Sir Malcolm Arnold. Arnold would assist the aging Walton by orchestrating, conducting and writing additional cues. With the score not long enough and not sounding enough like a standard aerial war picture, it was scrapped. Producers turned to Ron Goodwin (fresh off several British war films) to write the replacement. At the insistence of Olivier (threatening to take his name from the film), a piece of Walton remained in the film. The montage's "Battle in the Air" is still one of the score's highlights.   


For you score detectives out there, here's a rundown with a listing of how to hear some of these rejected scores.  Luckily many of these scores have been released recently.

Team America
No part of Shaiman's score has been released.
The Golden Child
While the original soundtrack featured a Barry cue and song, a 2011 release by La-La Land Records contains all of the unused score and Colombier's final score.
Jennifer 8
Jarre's entire score was released alongside Young's score in a 2012 La-La Land Records release.
Timeline
Varese Sarabande released the regular soundtrack to Tyler's score, while the same label released a very limited release of Goldsmith's unused score in 2004 (posthumously)  - giving his fans one more score to hear.
Mission: Impossible
Bootlegs have surfaced over the years with Silvestri's unfinished score.  Rumor is that parts of the music became parts of the following year's Eraser.
Chinatown
While Lambro was being rejected, he made a deal with the studio for publishing rights in return for parts of his score to be used in the film's marketing. It took until 2012, but Perserverance Records released Los Angeles, 1937.  The deal included not mentioning the Chinatown title, but you can hear his whole unused score and trailer music.  
Rogue One
Since there are no recordings, it seems that Desplat's ideas will never be heard.
Miss Congeniality 2
There were no score releases for either film - rejected or otherwise.  But you can make your own playlist of temp tracks!
Battle of Britain
Walton's Battle in the Air was on the original LP.  It was the 1999 Rykodisc/2004 Varese Sarabande release that featured all of his unused score in addition to the Goodwin score.

Sunday, July 16, 2017

Scoring the Series: Spider-Man

Back with Scoring the Series, as we look back at the various Spider-Man films.  With the release of the newest film, Spider-Man: Homecoming, we add Michael Giacchino to the list of top composers for our favorite web-slinger.  Here are the credits to each film with some scoring photos tossed in.   

Spider-Man (2002)
Music composed by Danny Elfman
Conducted by Pete Anthony
Orchestrated by Steve Bartek, Mark McKenzie, Edgardo Simone, David Slonaker, Marc Mann
Recorded and mixed by Dennis Sands
Recorded at Sony Pictures Scoring Stage




Spider-Man 2 (2004)
Music composed by Danny Elfman
Conducted by Pete Anthony
Orchestrated by Steve Bartek, Mark McKenzie, Edgardo Simone, David Slonaker
Additional music by John Debney, Christopher Young
Recorded and mixed by Dennis Sands
Recorded by the Hollywood Studio Symphony
Recorded at Sony Pictures Scoring Stage





Spider-Man 3 (2007)
Music composed by Christopher Young
Conducted by Pete Anthony
Orchestrated by Pete Anthony, Bruce Babcock, John Kull
Original themes/cues by Danny Elfman

The Amazing Spider-Man (2012)
Music composed by James Horner
Conducted by James Horner
Orchestrated by James Horner, J.A.C. Redford, Jon Kull, Steve Bernstein, Peter Boyer, Carl Johnson, Randy Kerber
Music arranged by Simon Rhodes, Simon Franglen, Ian Underwood
Recorded and mixed by Simon Rhodes
Recorded at Sony Pictures Scoring Stage




The Amazing Spider-Man 2 (2014)
Music composed by Hans Zimmer and the Magnificent Six
(Michael Einzinger, Junkie XL, Andrew Kawczynski, Johnny Marr, Steve Mazzaro, Pharrell Williams)
Conducted by Nick-Glennie Smith
Orchestrated by Bruce Fowler, Walt Fowler, Suzette Moriarty, Rhea Fowler, Kevin Kaska
Additional music by Andy Page, Adam Peters, Czarina Russell, Mario Reinsch
Recorded by Alan Meyerson
Recorded at Sony Pictures Scoring Stage





Spider-Man: Homecoming (2017)
Music composed by Michael Giacchino
Conducted by Marshall Bowen III
Orchestrated by Jeff Kryka, William Ross, Marshall Bowen III, Cameron Patrick, Curtis Green, Michael Giacchino
Recorded and mixed by Joel Iwataki
Recorded at 20th Century Fox's Newman Scoring Stage